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The Best Java Developer's Tablet EvER! 
In my personal quest to find the absolute-best portable platform, like others I have stumbled across the Model 100 (two month battery life - I still use it on campouts!), HP-200LX (six week battery life), Sharp Zaurus, Mitsubishi's Amity, Asus's Eee PC, Toshiba's NBs, as well as various Apple and Android devices.

When it comes to developing Java on-the-go however, nothing I have ever come across comes even close to using a Microsoft Window-capable Tablet!

Windows + Java = Nerdvana?


While Microsoft broke it's promise to play fairly with Sun's Java, the fact remains that the new crop of Windows 8 Tablets are truly the very best on-the-go platforms for serious Java efforts.



Having the opportunity to recently acquire a 64 GB ASUS Transformer Book for $250.oo, I would have to sell my trackball & return to working at a fast-food joint if I did not tell everyone how magnificent the new quad-core Atom Processors are!

Truly Awesome


While amazingly responsive when running Java, surely the ability to responsively write + debug code once the keyboard is in-place is the most compelling reason to add a Microsoft Tablet to the geeky arsenal. The full-sized USB port on the removable keyboard also goes a long way to allowing us to re-use our host of USB storage devices on-the-do.

.... and do not ever get me started on praising the longer battery lives, as well as faster recharge rates ... While the Model 100 will possibly be forever grafted on my bug-out gear, the T100 is what the TSA scans in the corporate backpack.

Java 'Tech


So what's my preferred R&D Toolkit for the platform?

-Glad you asked: I use Netbeans 8.x, as well as Oracle Java 1.7.x.

Why not use Java 1.8, you might ask?

Because - like many R&D sages - I too have noted that modern software development efforts have rapidly been becoming grossly inferior to what many have been traditionally accustomed to. -So rather than risk bashing an operating environment that cannot be quickly re-installed (yet another tragic use-case oversight!), I keep away from putting software on ANY machine that might cause even the slightest hint of a problem.

Your mileage may vary.



Sharing is Caring!

-Rn


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Installing MySQL Server & Workbench 
In a previous article we praised the innovative way Red Had allows us to rapidly install things like MySQL.


For the new learner however, note that at the time of this writing that only the MySQL Client (mysql-client) toolset will be installed.

Service, Please


If you are looking to do some R&D on your local host (we use a Virtual Box), then one will want to also install the MySQL Server tools (mysql-server), as well:

su
yum install mysql-server

Thereafter (*) we can start the locus via:

service mysqld start

As well as subsequently begin the MySQL console interface simply by typing
mysql
at the console interface.

MySQL Workbench


For those of us who absolutely love Microsoft SQL Server's SQL Management Studio (SSMS), note that MySQL has a must-have graphical tool set, as well. Formerly known as "MySQL Administrator", we now call it the "Workbench."



No matter what we call it however, the Community Edition of the GUI is the very next item most R&D folks will want to download.



Again at the time of this writing however, there is often an installation caveat. Before installation, try
yum install http://ftp.altlinux.org/pub/distributio ... x86_64.rpm
if you run into problems whilst doing something like
yum install mysql-workbench-community-6.1.7-1.el6.x86_64.rpm
Once installed, merely enter
mysql-workbench
at the console to get things rolling.


Google Fodder


Installing the MySQL Server will resolve error message such as:
Error: Package: mysql-workbench-community-6.1.7-1.el6.x86_64 (/mysql-workbench-community-6.1.7-1.el6.x86_64) Requires: libtinyxml.so.0()(64bit)

[ERROR 2002 (HY000): Can't connect to local MySQL server through socket '/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock' (2)

-as well as:
mysqld: unrecognized service

or someday perhaps even:
mysqld: unrecognised service  ;-)





Ubuntu & Elsewhere


(*) Note that Ubuntu learns will want to use
sudo apd-get install mysql-server
sudo service mysqld start
rather than
yum ...
. Otherwise, everything else in this post will work the same.

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